Metrics index

Full list of conversion metrics

Awareness

3 second stay rate

The percentage of new visitors who stayed on the landing page for 3 seconds or more, which is enough time to form the first impression. If people leave at this stage, something is clearly broken, but the easiest to fix.

7 second stay rate

The percentage of new visitors who paid attention to the content for 7 seconds or more. This amount of time is enough for the person to figure out the problem the product aims to solve. This phase is sometimes called problem awareness.

15 second stay rate

The percentage of visitors who paid attention to the content for 15 seconds or more. This amount of time should be enough for the visitor to figure out how the product solves the presented problem. This phase is sometimes referred to as solution awareness.

Interest

1 minute stay rate

This is the percentage of visitors who paid attention to the content for one minute or more. These visitors are clearly interested in the product.

3 minute stay rate

The percentage of visitors who stayed three minutes or more. These visitors are more likely to return in the near future *

Time reading

The amount of time the person actively spends on a single web page. Other popular terms for this metric are “time engaged,“ “attention time,“ or “dwell time.“

Viewports consumed

The number of viewports consumed on a page. A viewport is marked as consumed when it receives enough active time. This time depends on the viewport size. Bigger viewports require more time than the smaller viewports. For example a 1440 × 900 sized viewports requires roughly 15 seconds of active time.

Continue rate

Percentage of visitors who continued to the next page. This is the inverse of bounce rate, but the meaning is positive.

Pages visited

The number of pages visited on a single session. Hidden, unvisited browser tabs are ignored.

Engagement score

Engagement score signals how good a page is on holding visitor attention. This analytical score is built as follows:

  • 0.5 points — from staying 7 seconds on the page
  • 1 point — from staying 15 seconds on the page
  • 5 points — for one minute of activity
  • 10 points — for three minutes of activity
  • 10 points — for proceeding to the next page

So when everyone continues to the next page, the score is 100 and if everyone actively engages three minutes on the page and then proceeds to the next page, the score is a hefty 200. A low score, however, means that the experience was somehow wrong, and people leave the site quickly after entering the page.

Desire

Visitor lifetime

The total amount of days the visitor engages with a website before before they stop coming back.

Return rate

The percentage of visitors who came back once or more.

Re-return rate

The percentage of visitors who came back twice or more.

Visit count

The total amount of visits during the visitor lifetime.

Total time engaged

The total amount of seconds the person had been focusing on the content within the lifetime of the visitor.

Total viewports consumed

The total amount of viewports consumed within the lifetime of the visitor.

Conversions

Sign-up rate

The percentage of visitors who register on the site and gave their contact information. Also known as “lead conversion rate”.

Invite rate

The percentage of visitors who invited other people to your product contributing to viral growth. These inviters become your “promoters” or “evangelists”.

Invitations

The total amount of invitations made by a visitor.

Peer signup rate

The percentage of the invited peers who accepted the invitation and signed up on the website. Also known as the “accept rate.“

Viral co-efficient

The number of new sign-ups a visitor generates. If this is 0.5, then each visitor brings in 0.5 new leads. A value greater than one implies exponential growth.

Purchase rate

The percentage of visitors turned into paying customers. Also known as “customer conversion rate”.

Re-purchase rate

The percentage of visitors who purchased more than once.

Revenue per visitor

The amount of revenue visitors bring during their lifetime.

You can use this metric to sort the segments from most valuable to least valuable and is a useful “north star metric” for e-commerce sites and mobile applications where the sales cycles are short and where you have enough customer conversions (hundreds per segment) for statistically significant results.

Traction

Traction is an analytical score from all the metrics in the conversion funnel. Volument uses following weights when calculating this score:

  • 1 — from one minute of engagement
  • 3 — from three minutes of engagement
  • 10 — for coming back to the site
  • 5 — for coming back again
  • 20 — for signing-up
  • 10 — for inviting friends to the site
  • 100 — for making a purchase
  • 20 — for making another purchase

The resulting sum varies between 0-100, but rise above 100 with virally growing businesses. We also assign a grade for the score as follows:

  • A (70+): exceptionally strong traction
  • B (50-70): strong traction
  • C (30-50): some traction
  • D (10-30): weak traction
  • F (0-10): no traction

Traction is an excellent way to rank the marketing segments from good to bad because it works for all businesses. It works for SAAS products with long trials and sales cycles. It works for young startups who don't make enough customer conversions with statistically significant results. Moreover, it works for non-profit organizations.